ActiveNutritionWeight Loss

Owning Your Excuses

Poor You

You have excuses. You feel like crap. You are constantly tired. Your kids take up all your time and you can’t make time for you. You do so many things for so many other people. You are not healthy and possibly overweight. During the week, your life revolves around work. Because of your week routine, your diet consists of coffee and pastries for breakfast, burger and fries for lunch, and maybe another form of take out for dinner. If you are having a good day, maybe you prepared your dinner at home.

Over the past few weeks, I have blogged about ways to help you drop the excuses and take steps to make your life healthier during the course of one week. The posts were broken down as follows:

  1. Preparing Healthier Weekly Meals
  2. Working in an Office
  3. Eating on the Road
  4. Planning Multiple Workouts
  5. Maximizing the Commute

These five articles are concepts to help you become a better you. If you want to stop feeling like crap or feeling tired, do something. Change something.

No Excuses

My life didn’t change overnight. Over the course of several weeks I took steps to own me using the concepts in my previous articles. The first part in fixing me was getting me moving. As I got moving more, I really wanted to lose weight and feel better, so I started logging my food to better understand why the weight wasn’t dropping faster. I honestly didn’t think my diet was all that bad. Was I ever wrong. Many meals averaged ~1000 calories and my macronutrient ratios (proteins, carbs, and fats) were terrible. I used this data to make changes.

I might not be a nutritionist, but I have successfully become a healthier person using the tools I have shared. If you are looking for help in getting moving and feeling better, drop the excuses and call me.

Keli Hay is a certified personal trainer using her weight loss success to help others.

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A Week In a Healthier Life Series – Part 5

Maximizing the Commute

In the previous article, I outlined how I used my workdays to incorporate activity including during the commute.

“Workdays in the office, I was up at 4:30am for a 5:56am train. For the walks on either side of the train ride, I always took longer routes than necessary, equaling 2-3 miles. During the end of day commute, I would go directly home, but after dinner go for a 3-4 mile walk.”

I have lived less than a mile from my workplace, but as far as 36 miles away. For the 36 mile commute, I drove or did a combination of walking and public transportation. From an activity aspect, the best commute was not driving. When I did the walk and public transportation combination, I walked almost 4 miles between the morning and evening commutes. When driving, I was mentally drained by the time I got home and did nothing.

Regardless of your situation, there are ways you can get in activity.

Short Commutes

If you are fortunate enough to have a commute of 10 miles are less – use it! Leave earlier and walk, run, or bike it. A 2-3 mile walk can be completed 30-45 minutes and burn over 200 calories.

Long Commutes

Long commutes are mentally and physically tough on anyone. If you must drive, plan around your drive. Most commute time tends to include extra time in traffic because of rush hour. In the Bay Area, most people work between 9am and 6pm. The busiest driving hours are between 6am and 10am and 3pm and 7pm depending on the area. Combining traffic and office time, most people tend to be away from home for 10-16 hours a day. If you need to be in the office for 9am and leave at 5pm, but then sit in traffic for 2 hours on the drive home, why not shift your arrival or departure times? Use the office or join a nearby gym and get a work out in. You could schedule a midday lunch workout and leave the office an hour later or leave your desk at 5pm, go to the gym, and then hit the road at 6pm hitting the end of the rush hour timeframe.

If you work a later day, then do the opposite. Long story short – plan for a 30-60 minute workout instead of sitting in traffic for that time span. Most commute time can be reduce by leaving earlier or later, so why not spend that time being active!

Keli Hay is a certified personal trainer using her weight loss success to help others.

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A Week In a Healthier Life Series – Part 4

Planning Multiple Workouts

If you are looking to build muscle, there are various tools online to help you design plans and programs. In this post, I am focusing on how you can incorporate different workouts, or be more active, in a week long period while dealing with an office/work life.

How I Became More Active

Using my previous life in tech, I will use portions of my week to provide ideas on things that you can do. Sunday is my typical quiet, or down day. Occasional Sundays include a 30-60 minute morning walk with the dogs. Throughout the day, laundry and meal preparation is done. In the late afternoon or evening, I always go for a long walk. This walk averages 6 miles and takes a couple of hours at a minimum.

Workdays in the office, I was up at 4:30am for a 5:56am train. For the walks on either side of the train ride, I always took longer routes than necessary, equaling 2-3 miles. During the end of day commute, I would go directly home, but after dinner go for a 3-4 mile walk. As mentioned in part 2 of this series, I also made the most of the office by taking stairs and walking laps of the building.

On work from home days, I was also up at 4:30am and in the gym for 5am. I would do an hour of cardio to replace the lost walk of the commute. In the afternoons of these days, I was back in the gym doing light cardio; stretching and rolling; and weight training.

Even though Saturdays quite often vary, most mornings include a trip to the gym for cardio or weight training.

What You Can Do During the Week

Many companies and apartment complexes have basic onsite gyms. Get into the office early, block off time midday, or stay later and use it. If there isn’t a gym onsite, find one near the office or your home.

What You Can Do On Weekends

Go for a walk around your neighborhood, town, or city. Drive out of the city and find walking or biking trails. If you have kids involved in activities, find ways to help, such as running drills. If this is not an option, but you can drop them off and leave, then go to a nearby gym. If you need to stay, stand up and move as much as possible. Since many kids activities involve sports fields – walk the perimeter. Don’t use your kids as an excuse to be inactive, but find ways to use them and become more active.

Keli Hay is a certified personal trainer using her weight loss success to help others.

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A Week In a Healthier Life Series – Part 2

Working in an Office

When I started my weight loss journey, I was working in an office and I commuted ~60 minutes each direction. Eventually I swapped 2 in office days for working from home so that I could workout with my trainer during the non-peak gym hours. Regardless of my work location, I did my cardio.

Company Office

When in the office, I always took the stairs. I also took laps when going to the bathroom or for a drink. Most importantly, I made myself take breaks. If I had less than 30 minutes between meetings, I would address a couple of quick emails and then go for a walk. Based on the meeting room location, I would take the longest route as much as possible. If I had a 2+ hour block of heads down work time, when I found a decent break between tasks, I walked a couple laps of the floor and refilled my water bottle. These little breaks would take as little as 5 minutes, but no more than 15.

Home Office

When working from home, I went to the gym for 5am when it opened and did an hour of cardio. During the day, I would take a similar approach to being in the office and find moments for quick breaks. Late afternoon, I was back at the gym for my training session.

My boss worked remote, so unless I really needed my laptop for the call, I would walk and talk with her on my cell. For all lunch breaks – which I always took – I would take 30-60 minutes. Half of the break would be eating, while the rest would be a walk.

In a nutshell, make your moments and get moving.

Keli Hay is a certified personal trainer using her weight loss success to help others.

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