ActivePersonal Health

The Importance of Interacting at the Gym

For the first year at the gym, I didn’t like interacting with anyone at the gym. I had a regular weekly routine established that included commuting to the City on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday, and popping into the gym most of those nights. On Tuesday and Thursday, I was at the gym for cardio at 5am and back around 2pm for my session with my personal trainer. I was also in on the weekends.

How I Work

When I am in workout mode the gym, I tend to plug in to music and tune out the rest of the world. I have always been this way. What has changed over the past couple of years is my interactions with people and their interactions with me. As I was losing the weight, I started interacting more with the personal trainers and eventually some of their clients and other gym members. People also started chatting with me more and more because they were noticing my changes.

Why it Matters

Gyms can be intimidating. Pushing through personal and physical challenges is…challenging. Social interactions and human contact is very important for overall health. Based on personal experience, I would say it is even more important when you are unhealthy and trying to get moving at a gym. In previous gym-life experiences, I never interacted with people. I also never lost weight and I lost interest in going. The gym can be a fantastic place to establish a sense of family. A family to help you mentally disconnect from other daily stressors and bring up your endorphins.

Paying it Forward

When I am at the gym now, I make a point of chatting with various people before and after my workouts. Anyone who I know struggles to make it to the gym – either because they are older or struggling with health – I congratulate them on getting into the gym. When people compliment me on my work ethic and weight loss, my responses vary from a simple thank you, to a “you can also do it”, or tips to give them personal challenges. I encourage you – regardless of your personal goals – to not only join a gym to get moving, but interact with people and find some good gym friends.

Keli Hay is a certified personal trainer using her weight loss success to help others.

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ActiveFoodNutrition

Losing Weight Is Easy

I never ever thought I would say or believe it, but losing weight is easy. Many people say they need to lose weight. Many more people have been told by doctors that they must lose weight, yet 46 states report obesity rates of over 25%. Like anything else in life, losing weight consists of parts, steps, or phases. Step one, which is definitely the hardest part, is mentally owning it. The most important aspect of weight loss is patience. It takes years to put weight on, so be patient to take it off.

My Moment

At my heaviest, I knew I had to lose weight. I didn’t have diabetes or any life threatening diseases, but I had overall body aches and wicked plantar fasciitis in both feet. I was also generally miserable. Sleeping was uncomfortable and very restless. Standing was impossible for more than 15 minutes. Walking – which I love to do – was 30 minutes maximum.

My “what the hell have I done to myself?” moment was the black and white picture taken of me during RSA USA 2016. It brought me to tears. I knew I had to do something and stop with the excuses.

Eating Less or Moving More

Joining the gym was the next step. I have joined gyms before and had trainers before. I have also done weight loss programs before. Both yielded partial results. Neither were performed at the same time. When I joined the gym in 2016, because I said my goal was to lose weight, my trainer discussed nutrition at every session. As my trainer pushed me physically, and my body was struggling to keep up, I started to listen. I didn’t think my diet was all that bad. I also thought that since I was moving more, the weight should simply fall off. Logging my food and discussing food choices and alternatives was a wake up call.

People that have been fit or healthy most of their lives do not realize how difficult it is for an unhealthy person to bring the world of nutrition and exercise together. Advertisers promote weight loss programs or gyms, but never do they collaborate. Why would they? The long term success rates of weight loss only programs have guaranteed continued revenue. Someone physically moving, but not changing nutrition for complete improvements guarantees continued gym memberships.

Reminders

  • Step one – mentally own it.
  • Ongoing patience is required.

It took me over 20 years years to hit 260 lbs, but it only took me 11 months to lose more than 100 of it.

Keli Hay is a certified personal trainer using her weight loss success to help others.

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ActiveTrainingWeight Loss

Helping Me Get Lean – Testing Fitbit Coach

I have been a regular Fitbit user for over 4 years. My first Fitbit was the original device, which I used mainly to track my steps. At the time it was perfect. For Christmas 2016, I was gifted the Blaze. While I loved the watch, the battery started having problems after a few months, so I had to charge it every night. I honestly didn’t report the fault and decided to evaluate different options instead of reaching out for a replacement.

Current Device

For Christmas 2017, I was gifted the Ionic. As a Personal Trainer, I absolutely love it! For daily use, I have the main screen showing the date, time, my heart rate, and a rotation of steps, distance, floors, active minutes, and calories in a variety of displays. I use the timer and alarms daily for personal and client work outs.

Fitbit Coach

Today, I signed up for the Fitbit Coach. While I have my trainer kicking my butt 2-3 times a week, I am looking for more. My schedule varies from 60 to 180 minute chunks of time for me to work out. Within this window, I need to warm up, do a workout, cool down, possibly shower, definitely change, and get ready for my next appointment.

Why I Am Trying It

My biggest challenge is my 60 minute breaks. I have a few go to routines, but typically end up walking the treadmill for part of it or doing something involving crunches and push ups. For my program of leaning out with my Fitbit Coach, there are workouts ranging from 7-10 minutes, 11-15 minutes, and so on. Because my daily workouts are programmed around muscles used, I am happy that I can also specify the muscle focus.

I have already found my leg and core workout for the morning. This 21 minute workout will occur between a warm up (stretch, roll, and short treadmill) followed by a 30 minute treadmill cool down.

Look for me sharing my experience on Instagram.

Keli Hay is a certified personal trainer using her weight loss success to help others.

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RugbySportsTraining

Sports Training and the Weight Room

A recent post by Keir Wenham-Flatt discusses training in the weight room versus sports performance. In this article, he compares an athlete training in sport only to an athlete doing weight room training only. Keir deduces that the sport-only training athlete would win “every single day of the week!”

I’ve been thinking lots about this article. While he does go on to say that physical training might be required if a structured sport practice cannot achieve the physical goals, I partially dispute this for some sports.

Who Am I to Comment?

Am I a professional sports athlete? No. Am I a strength and conditioning coach – not yet, but I am working on it.

Recently, I have started helping a rugby team – coaching, training, and first aid stuff. The team ranges in physical condition from thin to heavy, with some strong forwards, and several fast backs. What I have observed, is the cardio-strong players get run over by the opposition because they are unable to anchor themselves to the ground and wrap the opponent. The forwards either have decent leg strength, but lack full range of motion to get down and drive, or they can get deep, but lack the power to drive. The smaller guys also become noticeable weaknesses in scrums, at line outs, or in rucks.

Why the Weight Room Is Important All the Time

I believe that an athlete, such as a rugby or football player, requires a mix of sport and weight training year round. Why? These guys vary in size and so do the people they line up against. If my forward pack weighs a combined 878kg (1935 lbs) and are up against a pack weighing 936kg (2063 lbs), which team will probably be stronger in the scrum? If you don’t prepare individual forwards to front and back squat heavy or push a heavy sled, how will they build the strength to push against the heavier opposition? Maybe a rugby player will eventually develop the strength to push everyone around, but withouts weights as part of the equation, it is going to be difficult for me weighing 150 pounds to develop the strength to knock down someone weighing even just 30 pounds more.

Unfortunately, sports also have off seasons. During this time, I believe it is even more important that the gym and weights be used to maintain/improve for the next season.

Keli Hay is a certified personal trainer using her weight loss success to help others.

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